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How did you deal with hair loss?

Losing your hair during treatment can be a difficult process. Some people decide to take control and cut it themselves before it starts to go. Others try new wigs or hair styles. What did you do, and how did you cope?

  1. I still am not coping well as amale in the entertainment business and always rocking a nice head of hair this has affected my confidence, which is basically gone. I dont go anywhere without a hat. If I have to take it off for some reason it gives severe anxiety and I want to go hide somewhere. I dont look good with a bald head so that is out. It has affected my business, social life and over all self esteem. Without a hat I cant even look at myself anymore. At this point I dont know what to do

    1. I can understand the confidence a hat can bring, the itchiness too. So much of our self esteem is tied to our hair. I didn't realize how much until chemo removed a lot of it. I have considered a wig, but I haven't tried one yet. That may be our best option so far. Maria (blood-cancer.com team member)

  2. Thanks for your reply I could see how for a women a wig would work. For man not so much. I have been on stage my whole life and even the 80s I use to get body waves so it looked like like my hair was thicker than what it was since I always had fine hair. Than I got hair transplants, which I would do in a heartbeat now but they wont do it because of the Chemo. I always felt better with thinck hair. The other thing is I am the only one in my family who doesn't have hair so its like a punch in the gut every time I see my family members. I get angry and jealous

    1. Interesting perspective and it's true how the same experience of hair loss can be different between men versus women. All I can say is you'd be surprised by what some hair artists have done for men who seek that full mane despite treatment and hair loss, and the look of it being a wig. Don't be angry try and do some research on hair stylists in your region who have worked with cancer patients or people with alopecia. Wishing you the very best!

    2. I appreciate your perspective. The chemo drug I was given didn't cause me to lose my hair. But my thick curly hair came in thinner and straighter. When I looked in the mirror, I just didn't feel like myself. I felt a lot of sadness and frustration over that. I think any changes to our usual selves can bring feelings of frustration, anger and jealousy. The lesson I keep being faced with is learning to love myself exactly where I am. I know when I find those moments, what I look like seems a lot less important. But I think before we reach those places of self love, we have to honor every feeling that comes up and give it awareness so we can work through it. I imagine that you are quite handsome without hair, and your family is so happy that you are here. Thanks for sharing this! It helped me, and I know it helped others.

  3. I got the 'pixie cut's as a first step. I thought THAT was short. Ha! Wasn't long after, had to rock the shaved head. Took me by surprise 🫢. A necessary evil I
    guess, (my attempt to be okay with it). HUGE adjustment... surprised at my embarrassment.

    1. Don't be embarrassed - sometimes we don't know until we know 😀
      Best!

    2. It's very surprising to look in the mirror and see something different. I can fully understand that embarrassed feeling! I hope your adjustment became easy. for you. What did your hair look like before?

  4. For almost 35 years I had an impressive handlebar mustache. With advancing years came the dreaded gray hairs. My wife and daughter often suggested it was time to shave it off as the mixture of gray and tan made the once dark brown stash look "Green" .


    Being male I resisted the suggestions for several years. One evening I just shaved it off. I was horrified at how awful my top lip looked. My face was tan at the time and the skin under the stash was a white as snow . My self image and confidence were shaken. My family cheered and fellow office workers did not recognize me at first the next day


    In time slowly began to realize I was still the same person, had the same talents and gifts and it was simply adjusting to a new look - I was far harder on my self than others were on me. My advice ... When the storms of life come along ... It is best to embrace it and charge into the center of the storm vs finding the storms are now chasing you. Dennis (Blood-Cancer.com TEAM)

    1. I mean you could just tell everyone you really, REALLY, like to drink milk. Like all the time. Everyday. Even milk juice boxes. Ha ha. 😀 You are right - everyone who is human has a thing they don't like about their bodies, sometimes more than one! It is still, after long last, just us! Keep on keepin' on, DPM

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